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Use of Eye-Tracking Technology in Research with Children with Cerebral Palsy: Insights into utility

Session 
6.01
Research Stream
  • Tom Griffiths (Great Ormond Street Hospital / UCL)
Summary

In recent years, the development of eye-tracking technology (ETT) has allowed more accurate measurement of gaze behaviours. This presentation looks at the use of this technology to gather research data on the visual responses of children with cerebral palsy (CP), particularly with regard to the need for accurate calibration. The paper will also discuss the use of technological and behavioural methods of assessing functional gaze control skills, which are key to effective use of gaze control technology. Although eye-gaze access systems excel at allowing exploration without the need for calibration, accurate calibration is particularly key in research, as results are questionable if such a calibration is not achieved. Preliminary results from our work indicate some children have been able to calibrate and some have not. Factors affecting this will be discussed as part of the session.

Method/Activities/Techniques

Sixty six children with cerebral palsy were presented with a variety of different stimuli on an eye-tracking computer. Response and reaction time(s) were collected by the research team using specialist software. The presenter will also discuss calibration of the device and the challenges that this appears to present to this group of children.

Results/Findings

The session will provide some preliminary quantitative data to demonstrate the utility of the technology with this group and some case examples and videos will be shown to better illustrate points discussed.

Conclusions

Although eye-gaze access systems excel at allowing exploration without the need for calibration, accurate calibration of an eye-tracking system is particularly key in assessment, as results are questionable if such a calibration is not achieved. Preliminary results from our work indicate some children have been able to calibrate and some have not. Factors affecting this will be discussed as part of the session.

Level of Session 
General
Age Group 
Child
Interest 
Primary school
Secondary school
Special school